Jadav Payeng

Jadav Molai Peyang, ‘Forest Man of India’ single-handedly plants acre of forest on a barren sandbar. There are many international organizations that have been working to save our planet from many harms of deforestation but there is one Indian man who, single-handedly, gave rise to the forest in acre land and converted it into the man-made forest in India and that man is Jadav Molai Peyang. The forest man has planted over saplings since which has grown into the famous, Molai Kathoni, the forest famously named after his maker. Peyang had started this initiative as a teenager who started planting bamboo in the woodland after he had witnessed deaths of several snakes at the shore when water had resided from the area after a flood. Following that horrifying scenario, he sought the advice from the village elders who asked him to grow a forest as only the forest can save the lives of birds and animals. The elephants pay a yearly visit to his forest and give birth to their calves in the comfort there. In the initial stages, he found planting trees extremely difficult and time-consuming but now as he gets the seeds from the trees, the forest seems to live on itself.

This Indian man planted a tree every day for 35 years. The result is unbelievable

The floods had denuded the island and the young lad, when he was barely years-old in April , decided to create a new life on the tough terrain covered with sand and silt. Jadav turned to the villagers, who advised him to grow trees and offered 50 seeds and 25 bamboo plants. He sowed the seeds and shoots and now, years later, he has reaped a forest. The Molai forest, named after him, is located near Kokilamukh in Jorhat, and encompasses an area of about 1, acres. Jadav watered the plants morning and evening, and even collected red ants from his village and transported them to the sandbar all by himself.

In the end, nature reciprocated and soon there was a variety of flora and fauna, including endangered animals like the one-horned Rhino and the Royal Bengal Tiger in the forest.

Jadav Payeng, “The Forest Man of India,” has planted tens of Payeng has single-handedly changed the landscape in his state of Assam. “You plant one or two trees, and they have to seed. The entire ecosystem knows.

He earned this name by spending 30 years of his life planting trees, creating a real man-made forest of hectares. Thanks to this reforestation, wildlife has returned to the area. Incredibly, he did it all by himself. This is his story. It has a total area of about 1, hectares and is under continuous threat due to the extensive soil erosion on its banks. Majuli has shrunk over the past 70 years by more than half.

There are concerns that it could be submerged within the next 20 years. To fight this, in , the Assam Forestry Division of Golaghat district began a plan to reforest hectares of the forest in one of the sandbars of the Brahmaputra river. After that, the forest was single-handedly attended by Jadav Payeng during the course of over 30 years. He began planting bamboo. Then, he continued planting other species.

Man Plants A Tree Every Day For 40 Years, Turns Barren Land Into A Forest Bigger Than Central Park

The limbless beasts had been stranded on the barren banks and perished in the unmitigated heat due to the lack of shade or tree cover. Payeng wept over the corpses but resolved to turn his sadness into action. Like the Bruce Wayne of environmental preservation Payang abandoned his previous life and began living on the shore of the river to tend to a crop of bamboo that he planted by hand. As the hearty bamboo crop became a tall hedge he began planting larger plants and trees, doggedly and single-handedly transforming the fallow ground.

Jadav “Molai” Payeng, the ‘Forest Man of India’, has achieved The Padma Shri awardee is known for single-handedly planting nearly 1, acres of forest on a Brahmaputra sandbar in Assam. Since then, he decided to plant trees on the sandbar and has not Fight against Coronavirus: Full coverage.

Jadav Payeng, known as the Forest Man of India, spent 30 years of his life planting trees to save his island, creating a forest and restoring wildlife in it. Jadav Payeng is better known as the Forest Man of India. He earned this name by spending 30 years of his life planting trees, creating a real man-made forest of hectares. Thanks to this reforestation, wildlife has returned to the area. Incredibly, he did it all by himself. This is his story. It has a total area of about 1, hectares and is under continuous threat due to the extensive soil erosion on its banks.

Majuli has shrunk over the past 70 years by more than half. There are concerns that it could be submerged within the next 20 years. To fight this, in , the Assam Forestry Division of Golaghat district began a plan to reforest hectares of the forest in one of the sandbars of the Brahmaputra river. However, the program was sadly abandoned in After that, the forest was single-handedly attended by Jadav Payeng during the course of over 30 years.

He began planting bamboo. Then, he continued planting other species.

Indian Man Single-Handedly Plants a 1,360-Acre Forest

And that was the turning point of his life. Moved by his single-handedly planting a hectare forest in 36 years, thus converting the sandbar into an oasis and paradise for animals, the Canadian documentary director McMaster spent six months shooting by his place and produced a documentary titled Forest Man Of India. Once released, this documentary became a hit in India and moved people around the world, with over ,, of people from all walks of life watching and clicking like on his story online.

He was thus awarded the top award in this field, “Golden Award”, by the former president of India A.

Jadav Payeng is better known as the.

Julie McCarthy. Jadav Payeng, “The Forest Man of India,” has planted tens of thousands of trees over the course of nearly 40 years. He has made bloom a once desiccated island that lies in the Brahamputra river, which runs through his home state of Assam. On a journey to the little known Northeast region of India, you may encounter a dizzying array of traditional tribes, rugged beauty and wildlife, including the rare white rhinos.

It’s here we discover perhaps an even rarer creature: the “Forest Man of India. Payeng, 58, is reclaiming an island in the mighty Brahmaputra river where increased flooding has changed the flow and built up sandbars along the long stretch of the river that runs through the middle of Assam. Geographically separated from the Indian subcontinent, the northeast juts toward China, and is nestled along the borders of Bhutan and Tibet. Google Maps hide caption. Payeng keeps the hours of an insomniac.

We arrange ourselves in a boat for a short passage with him to his river island. By a.

Meet Jadav Payeng, the man who single-handedly planted an entire forest

The Padma Shri awardee is known for single-handedly planting nearly 1, acres of forest on a Brahmaputra sandbar in Assam. A resident of Aruna Sapori at Kokilamukh in Jorhat district, Payeng has inspired thousands around the world to take up a cause even if you are alone. Payeng’s quest began in when he was only 16 years old. During floods that year, a large number of snakes ashore on the sandbar. After the waters had receded, Payeng found the dead reptiles on the shore.

Since then, he decided to plant trees on the sandbar and has not stopped even after planting several thousand trees.

Jadav Payeng – The Forest Man Of India Who Single-Handedly Years of sacrifice, grit, and determination of this man has created an entire 1,acre forest “I want the plants to be valued and believe that the world is big.

In 80 years, Thimmakka has single-handedly planted over trees and treated trees as her own children, which she biologically never had. However, Thimmaka is not the only example of afforestation crusaders in India. On the occasion of Earth Day , Efforts For Good shares the story of ten people, whose sole efforts have sprouted lush, green forests in barren drylands all over India. Aranyaani is also assisting farmers to manage such food forests on their own landholdings, amounting to another acres approximately.

Saklani was also a noted freedom fighter in his youth. In , he lost his eyesight as mud and pebbles went into his eyes while planting trees. Even without eyesight, he continued planting thousands of trees. He planted over 50 lakh trees in the hinterlands of his home state Uttarakhand.

One Man Single-Handedly Plants Forest Bigger Than Central Park

A lmost three decades ago, a teenager, after noticing the deaths of a large number of reptiles due to a lack of a tree cover, started planting Bamboo in an area that had been washed away by floods. That forest is now home to Bengal tigers, Indian rhinoceros, over deer and rabbits besides apes and several varieties of birds, including a large number of vultures. There are several thousand trees. Bamboo covers an area of over hectares.

Indian Man Single-Handedly Plants a 1,Acre Forest he moved to the site so he could work full-time creating a lush new forest ecosystem.

This man has been planting a tree every day since he was just 16 years old. As a teenager, he was mortified after witnessing hundreds of animals dying from drought amid the dwindling greenery on the island, so he resolved to plant one sapling every day. He started with simple botanical powerhouses, such as bamboo and cottonwood. After almost four decades of growth, his forest is now inhabited by hundreds of elephants, Bengal tigers, rhinos, boars, deer, reptiles, and birds.

Payeng says that he has lost count of how many trees he has planted — but he believes there are now hundreds of thousands of trees providing shade and shelter to the wildlife. And once they seed, the wind knows how to plant them, the birds here know how to sow them, cows know, elephants know, even the … river knows.

User Reviews

However one Indian man has made a stand — by single-handedly planting and cultivating a 1, acre forest that is home to a complex, thriving ecosystem. I sat down and wept over their lifeless forms. It was carnage.

Jadav Payeng lives in a small hut on the Indian river-Island of Majuli in north eastern India, with his wife and three children. A former labourer and.

Sign In. Forest Man Hide Spoilers. There are so many story in the world that almost slip through the cracks. I’m taking this documentary at face value here, but these seems to be one of those story. By accident, a journalist discovers an amazing person with an amazing view of the world. Thankfully, this journalist understands what he has found, and helps sharing the vision of this “forest man”. Now, this is only a short piece, not a full fledged character study. It leaves many questions unanswered.

Maybe because some of them we would rather not want to know the answers to, but hopefully the full story is just as amazing as the impression you get from this short. The main thing I get out if this is: I hope he is an early example of the way much of the world is going. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote. This documentary really is a small charmer.

The Molai Forest

As a teenager in the s, Jadav Payeng noticed a rush of snakes washing ashore, dead. Erosion had scrubbed away vegetation from Majuli island sandbars, stripping away grassy cover and ultimately forcing many native species to flee. Floodwaters transformed some parts into barren landscapes. Its shorelines receded with every monsoon rain.

Mar 22, – Jadav “Molai” Payeng is a local hero after single handedly planting and maintaining a acre forest and nature reserve.

Written by Marley Tinnock. Jadav Payeng lives in a small hut on the Indian river-Island of Majuli in north eastern India, with his wife and three children. A former labourer and forestry worker, Jadav began planting trees as a part of a government initiative in Then 16, he chose to remain behind after the project was over, in order to care for the plants and trees.

In what was once nothing more than a baron land mass; what appears to be a mirage from the river’s edge is now, Jadav’s forest. Having lost over half it’s landmass since , and with erosion quickly compounding on the island of Majuli, Jadav sought to protect his land and it’s inhabitants, committing himself to plant a sapling once every couple of days. Some 37 years later, Jadav is still tending to his trees, now boasting an area larger than New York City’s Central Park.

The hectare forest is home to many tigers, rhinos, deer, rabbits and apes, and is regularly visited by a large herd of elephant. Sadly, it’s no longer the planting of trees and vegetation that Jadav concerns himself with, having had to report poachers on multiple occasions, Jadav worries that local men will use the forest for economic gain. Saddened by his ongoing plight to protect the animals who now call his forest home, Jadav has proposed many ideas to government and forestry organisations, even trying to have the site listed by UNESCO, without any success.

Indian man plants 550 hectares of forest by himself over 30 years